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WOLVES
Anonymous asked:
I know that wolves are quite nearly always monogamous, but I was wondering... If, say, the male of a breeding pair died, would the female choose another mate? I'm writing a story, it has some (obviously fantasy, but very much reality based) wolves, and the male of the main breeding pair is killed.

Yes, she most likely will!

wolveswolves:

European wolf (Canis lupus lupus) by David and wolveswolves

"Throughout history man has externalized his bestial nature, finding a scapegoat upon which he could heap his sins and whose sacrificial death would be his atonement. He has put his sins of greed, lust, and deception on the wolf and put the wolf to death - in literature, in folklore, and in real life."

"Of Wolves and Men", Barry Lopez, 1978

(Source: wolveswolves)

By Patrick McDonough

(Source: wolveswolves)

Thanks guys for all the advice from yesterday’s issue about the housecleaning job at that lady :) You guys are always so willing to help and thinking along <3

I choose to trust my gut, so I sent her an e-mail explaining that her unexpected phonecall didn’t give me time to properly consider the decision and made me say “yes” too quickly, and that in hindsight the distance is too much. I also sent her some links to domestic workers in her area with about the same hourly wage, along with my sincere apologies.

I am a little nervous now that she will be mad at me, even though I know she has no right to be so. It’s just a little in my nature to easily feel responsible and guilty for my actions in cases while I in fact have no obligations or whatsoever, derp.

(Source: wolveswolves)

wolveswolves:

Three wolf pups fell asleep in front of their den 

Picture by Daniel Cox, scanned from the book ‘Wolves’ by Daniel Wood 

wolveswolves:

Wolves naturally do not retain pink in their nose, paws and lips. The picture’s information didn’t state anything about it, but this wolf probably has some decease or condition, like for example vitiligo which causes depigmentation of skin in certain areas.

Picture by Thomas Kitchin, scanned from the book ‘Wolves’ by Daniel Parent

Anonymous asked:
Hi Anne, I hope you are feeling good today :) I was wondering, and I apologise if you have already answered such a question, if you know a good book about wolves, that includes "everything" (e.g. behaviour, body traits, difference dog to wolf, social behaviour, etc). So, basically as much as possible in one book. Or maybe a combination of a few books to get "all" the information (I guess it's impossible to have everything in one or even in a few books haha). Thank you so much!

Hello love! I’m doing very well today, have been working on my wolf thesis and ate a lot of food, heheh. Hope you’re having a great day! :)

Anyway, may I present to you, the wolf bible: “Wolves: Behavior, ecology, and conservation" by David Mech and Luigi Boitani!

By Greg Governale

(Source: wolveswolves)

Guys I did something stupid

I reacted on an advertisement from a lady looking for someone who could help her in her household for a few hours a week. We called and agreed I’d come over on tuesday, clean her house for 2 hours

In hindsight, it’s not very convenient because she lives almost an hour away which isn’t really worth it, so I might want to cancel. Plus I just got a liiiitle bit of an odd feeling and I learned I better always trust my feelings. Thing is, she specifically asked me if I won’t back out because her last help quickly left already. 

What can I say to her?

(Source: wolveswolves)

wolveswolves:

Growling wolf

Picture by Maxime Riendeau

Wolf pups by Jim Brandenburg

(Source: wolveswolves)