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WOLVES
Anonymous asked:
Hey do you know any good wildlife cams? Maybe ones know for wolf sightings? I do like the captive ones but i enjoy waiting to see or not see something in the wild. :) (so yeah non-captive cams) Thank-you!

Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) by Diego Pérez Rivera

(Source: wolveswolves)

submitted:

In reaction to this ask: I think anon was talking about this documentary: “Fauna Iberica”. I remembered I saw it somewhere. Luckily I knew this spanish docu.

I took screens with this wolf from the docu, maybe not the best quality, but it’s kinda visible that the wolf has different eyes indeed. I don’t know Spanish, but it seems the wolves in this series are pure blood. It’s interesting. Seems like wolves, while it’s not normal, may have different eyes. 

Holy sh*t, this is one of the most beautiful wolves I have ever seen! Iberian wolves (Canis lupus signatus) are one of my favourite wolf subspecies, and these eyes are just mesmerizing! I know what documentary is next on my “to watch”-list, lol

Both the brown and the pale green are normal eye colours for Iberian wolves (having two green eyes or two brown eyes, that is). Heterochromia (different coloured eyes) is a genetic defect that can appear in wolf breeds as well, though like I said I’ve never seen a wolf with two different coloured eyes, so thank you so much for showing me this!

Anonymous asked:
What colors can wolves' eyes have? I tried to look it up in several books and found it in neither. I'm curious if any book or scientific paper includes sich an information? Like, all possible and documented wolf's eye colors. I know about yellow, grey, brown, blueish(not husky-blue, of course), greenish, and I've seen in one documentary an Iberian wolf with two eyes different, and this was not any hibrid.

mayawolf:

wolveswolves:

Wolves can have grey, green, brown, yellow, or orange eyes - all these colours can vary in the tone of lightness/darkness, though the green is a palish light green.

Unlike in several dog breeds like Huskies, heterochromia (different coloured eyes) is not a natural wolf trait. I’ve never seen a wolf with two different coloured eyes, but of course theoretically it is possible due to genetic defects.

The same goes for blue eyes. Wolves can only have appearing blue eyes when they have a genetic defect (such as cataracts, which is really rare). In a natural way, wolf eyes never come in blue. The Iberian wolf you mentioned most likely had two different coloured eyes due to genetic defects. Do you remember what documentary this was in?

Cubs are born with blue eyes, but that changes at about 6 weeks of age. Mature wolves do not retain blue as an eye color. Sometimes green or grey eyes can appear blue from certain angles or in certain lights. 

Hey there!

I happen to know this wolf personally, and I can say with 100% certainty that he is a pure wolf with blue eyes. These pictures have not been photo shopped in any way. It’s a genetic quirk that runs in his family. His father had blue eyes, and so does his brother. So, while it isn’t natural, it can happen, and it doesn’t necessarily signify that the animal is a hybrid.

Hi you! Do you happen to know what the people at the science center say about this? Like what kind of genetic defect? I’m very curious! :)
To prevent confusion I’ll put this here again, I didn’t say wolves can’t have blue eyes, but like I stated above, when they do, it’s because of a genetic defect and doesn’t come natural.

Also, I just thought of the fact that this might also be interesting: at Wolf Park, there’s this wolf called Reudi:

And at Wolf Conservation Center there was this wolf that recently passed away called Lukas:

Both of them have appearing blue eyes, while in fact they both have an extreme pale light gray eye colour. Their eyes appear blue from certain angles or in certain lights or surroundings. Their eyes were an extremely light gray, which causes them to be reflective of their environment. I don’t recall exactly, but I know Reudi had several genetic defects - one of them resulting in him having very short legs. No doubt these genetic defects caused his odd eye colour. Here's some more information on Reudi and his eyes.

Anonymous asked:
Can pure wolves have partly pink noses? Or noses with pink spots on it? I read different things and I thought they must be hybrids, but then I think I read somewhere that it happens with real wolves. Now I'm puzzled.

Wolves naturally do not retain pink in their nose, paws or lips. If a pure wolf has a partly pink nose, it most likely has some disease or condition, like for example vitiligo which causes depigmentation of skin in certain areas.

If you go to a wolf center, sanctuary, park, or zoo, and the wolves they claim are pure wolves have (partly) pink noses, they indeed are most likely hybrids :)

wolveswolves:

By Reimar Gaertner

Anonymous asked:
What colors can wolves' eyes have? I tried to look it up in several books and found it in neither. I'm curious if any book or scientific paper includes sich an information? Like, all possible and documented wolf's eye colors. I know about yellow, grey, brown, blueish(not husky-blue, of course), greenish, and I've seen in one documentary an Iberian wolf with two eyes different, and this was not any hibrid.

Wolves can have grey, green, brown, yellow, or orange eyes - all these colours can vary in the tone of lightness/darkness, though the green is a palish light green.

Unlike in several dog breeds like Huskies, heterochromia (different coloured eyes) is not a natural wolf trait. I’ve never seen a wolf with two different coloured eyes, but of course theoretically it is possible due to genetic defects.

The same goes for blue eyes. Wolves can have appearing blue eyes when they have a genetic defect (such as cataracts, which is really rare). In a natural way, wolf eyes never come in blue. The Iberian wolf you mentioned most likely had two different coloured eyes due to genetic defects. Do you remember what documentary this was in?

Cubs are born with blue eyes, but that changes at about 6 weeks of age. Mature wolves do not retain blue as an eye color. Sometimes green or grey eyes can appear blue from certain angles or in certain lights. 

By Andrea

(Source: wolveswolves)

Anonymous asked:
I've recently read that wolf behavior, which appear to be agressive for casual observers, is not that agressive as it appears to be, like, for example, that wolf mouthing another wolf's muzzle is actually friendly (and not so much is biting another wolf's muzzle with bare teeth). So I'm confused now. Can you write which wolf behavior is in fact agressive, and which is friendly? (I don't want you to post a link to/or paste everything about wolf behavior, please. Just this.)

Wolf behavior comes across as agressive to a lot of people, because it often looks like the wolves are seriously harming each other while in fact they are not. Their main way to comunicate is by using body language and it often looks more agressive or more painful for outsiders than that it actually is.

I don’t know if you have a dog or have ever played with one, but, when my dog and I play and wrestle a little, he uses his teeth and “bites” me, but he does so very carefully and controlled, and does not really bite or use his full strength. Once I had my arm in an empty cardboard packaging. He loves tearing those apart. He didn’t know my arm was in there, and therefore thought he could use his full strength. It felt like he almost crushed my bones, lol. What I’m trying to say is, a lot of things (like the mouthing another wolf’s muzzle you were talking about, which is indeed a sign of affection) probably looks painful but is in fact very controlled and/or gently.

Also important to note is that wolves have a basic aversion to fighting and will do much to avoid any aggressive encounters.

The biting another wolf’s muzzle is to express affection. Chasing each other and biting the tail or snapping in general when they’re playing is friendly as well. Uhh. It’s hard to come up with an example of typical agressive behavior. To tell what behavior is actually driven by agression, you have to watch closely to details in posture - things like the position of the ears, tail, lips, etc. so it depends on each situation.

Anonymous asked:
Do you watch movies about/with wolves? Like, let's say, The Legend of Lobo, or Loup (from 2009), or Vesegonskaya volchitsa? I wonder, since you're very into studying wolves, do you enjoy watching (if you do) fictional films about them, even if they're not always accurate on many wolf's life aspects?

I do, yes! Though it’s very hard for me to not get frustrated when they’re not accuratelt depicted (which is like 90% of the time, lol)

I did my graduation thesis on the psychological, scientifical, and political roots of the image of the wolf in American movies made between 1994 and 2014 ^^

wolveswolves:

By John Hyde

Anonymous asked:
As you've explained before, the concept of alphas in packs comes from artificial captive environments, but how do wolves socialize in a captive environment that's designed to be as natural as possible like in wolf sanctuaries such as Wolf Conservation Center?

You mean when the pack composition is as natural as possible, so like a breeding pair + offspring? In that case it would be the same as in the wild (sorry if I understood you wrong) ^^