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WOLVES
Anonymous asked:
I watched this documentary "Rise of the black wolf" and I have a few questions. There was a lone female with two grown pups, and when a stranger male wolf came, they became mates with the female and he "adopted" her already grown pups. He hunted for family and later he was hunting with female's sons as they were his own. My question is: does it happen in the wild? Male wolf adopting pups of a female or teaching them how to hunt, or was it only in the film and is not real? Thanks!

Yes, it does happen! When one of the parents die, usually another member of the pack replaces the deceased parent’s leading role. Often the replacing wolf is the same sex as the wolf that died, and will become the new mate of the remaining parent. If there aren’t any other adult pack members that can replace the role of the deceased parent, it often happens that the remaining parent looks for or accepts a new mate that isn’t from their pack – like in the documentary “Rise of black wolf”.

All wolves love cubs and are programmed to protect and nurture them. This can extend to pups that are not related to themselves, especially if the adopting wolf has pups of its own already. 

Also, there’s been studies done in which they followed wolf packs from who one of the breeding pair died. In those cases odd composed packs formed (for example two male wolves who were brothers and a new, unrelated female wolf who joined and paired with one of the brothers), but they all had in common a structure of a leading breeding pair. This studies concluded that apparently, wolves instinctively always seek for this structure in whatever unnatural group they end up or formed. 

(You can watch the documentary “Rise of black wolf” for free online here)

wolveswolves:

By Julie Lawrence

Made an Instagram: ElectricRainx

Add me if you like (✿◠‿◠)

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By Rudy

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Anonymous asked:
does your love for this dog has any relation to the fact that he's a bit wolf-like? XD

Mayyybeeee

image

 submitted:

My wolf tattoo I got a couple months ago. Thought I would share with you!!

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By Jeff Wendorff

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zadeira asked:
I don't seem to find if you have an instagram-account. If so, what is it?

:) It’s Electricrainx

wolveswolves:

By Werner Freund

Look what I encountered today! This gorgeous dog lives at a beach club where David and I stopped by to have a short break from our trip to the moorlands. He came greeting me by poking his snout at all possible places, and I petted him for a while. Since he was suffering a little from the heat, I showed him that if you dig in the sand a little, the sand underneath is cooler. He started digging like crazy and stuck his entire head all in the hole, so cuteee! Then he came standing next to me on the bench, acting very curiously, and I let him nose around in my bag. I am in love with a dog, help D:

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By KDC123

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 submitted:

Matching wolf tattoos with my brother :)

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Anonymous asked:
"By “per season”, they don’t mean that per every four season a wolf pair is going to breed..." Good conversation indeed, but by "per season" I didn't mean "per every season of the year", it's rather obvious that wolves mate once a year, and that in biology "per season" means "per mating season", so "per year" for wolves. Because what you did there was humiliating for me. It was humiliating to assume that I meant "per every of four seasons", implicating my stupidity on the subject.

I was explaining that in case you didn’t know that, and mainly because I could not think of any other reason why you would otherwise mention this than you not being aware of this. Assuming you might not be aware of this fact is not at all humiliating. I have a broadly varying audience on this blog, whose extent of knowledge of the wolf ranges widely. By implying that it is humiliating that I assumed you weren’t aware of this fact, you are in fact humiliating my possible followers who did not know this.

Anyway, I’m done discussing little nitpicking things like this with a grey face who is too childish to admit that their way of talking to me wasn’t very polite. Stop trying to find something I was wrong about, because I wasn’t. Let’s get over youself and if you want to discuss in a mature way I’m all ears! :)

Anonymous asked:
From the same book:"Proportion of monogamous packs (i.e.only one pair breeding per season) in the wild is high". PER SEASON, and "At 3 years of age, Whitey replaced her mother as breeding female..." I'm not saying that wolves don't mate for life, (again, not per season), but I wanted to discuss whether it's common to wolves or if it's another assumption like "no healthy wolf has ever killed..." bla blah.

By “per season”, they don’t mean that per every four season a wolf pair is going to breed. They mean that per breeding season, one wolf pair in the pack is going to breed. Wolves only breed once a year (typically from January to March), not four times a year.

The example of Whitey you refer to stems form a wild Arctic wolf pack David Mech studied for several years – you can read all of his findings on that in the online free available scientific article “A ten-year history of the demography and productivity of an Arctic wolf pack”. Whitey was a particular dominant female offspring from the breeding pair in that pack, who replaced her mother’s role as breeding female at the age of three, and started to produce pups with the former breeding male (Whitey’s father, so inbreeding). Another wolf from that pack called Left Shoulder (origin unknown but supposedly to be Whiteys brother) took over the place of the first breeding male and formed the new breeding pair with Whitey (again, inbreeding).

The described above is just one example, and looking at the over all wolf statistics, polygamous acts like these are indeed not uncommon, but definitely not the customary. Like I have stated since the beginning, typically, wolves are monogamous. I specifically use the term typically because just like in many scientific cases of whatever subject, there are exceptions. So yes, it is common for wolves to be monogamous – exceptions left aside.

Really, I love discussing matters like this, so I like that you touch subjects like this and address comments or questions! But only in a respectful, polite way and not by your rude, bitchy comments like “well look at that, *brawl brawl*”.